role Mixy

Collection of distinct objects with Real weights

role Mixy does Baggy { }

A role for collections of weighted values. See Mix and MixHash. Mixy objects differ from Baggy objects in that the weights of Mixy are Reals rather than Ints.

Methods

method total

method total(--> Real)

Returns the sum of all the weights

mix('a''b''c''a''a''d').total == 6# RESULT: «True» 
{=> 5.6=> 2.4}.Mix.total == 8;          # RESULT: «True» 

method roll

method roll($count = 1)

Similar to a Bag.roll, but with Real weights rather than integral ones.

See Also

Sets, Bags, and Mixes

Type graph

Type relations for Mixy
perl6-type-graph Mixy Mixy Baggy Baggy Mixy->Baggy Associative Associative QuantHash QuantHash QuantHash->Associative Baggy->QuantHash Mu Mu Any Any Any->Mu MixHash MixHash MixHash->Mixy MixHash->Any Mix Mix Mix->Mixy Mix->Any

Stand-alone image: vector

Routines supplied by role Baggy

Mixy does role Baggy, which provides the following methods:

(Baggy) method new-from-pairs

Defined as:

method new-from-pairs(*@pairs --> Baggy:D)

Constructs a Baggy objects from a list of Pair objects given as positional arguments:

say Mix.new-from-pairs: 'butter' => 0.22'sugar' => 0.1'sugar' => 0.02;
# OUTPUT: «mix(butter(0.22), sugar(0.12))␤» 

Note: be sure you aren't accidentally passing the Pairs as positional arguments; the quotes around the keys in the above example are significant.

(Baggy) method grab

Defined as:

multi method grab(Baggy:D: --> Any)
multi method grab(Baggy:D: $count --> Array:D)

Like pick, a grab returns a random selection of elements, weighted by the values corresponding to each key. Unlike pick, it works only on mutable structures, e.g. BagHash. Use of grab on an immutable structure results in an X::Immutable exception. If * is passed as $count, or $count is greater than or equal to the total of the invocant, then total elements from the invocant are returned in a random sequence.

Grabbing decrements the grabbed key's weight by one (deleting the key when it reaches 0). By definition, the total of the invocant also decreases by one, so the probabilities stay consistent through subsequent grab operations.

my $cars = ('Ford' => 2'Rover' => 3).BagHash;
say $cars.grab;                                   # OUTPUT: «Ford␤» 
say $cars.grab(2);                                # OUTPUT: «[Rover Rover]␤» 
say $cars.grab(*);                                # OUTPUT: «[Rover Ford]␤» 
 
my $breakfast = ('eggs' => 2'bacon' => 3).Bag;
say $breakfast.grab;
CATCH { default { put .^name''.Str } };
# OUTPUT: «X::Immutable: Cannot call 'grab' on an immutable 'Bag'␤» 

(Baggy) method grabpairs

Defined as:

multi method grabpairs(Baggy:D: --> Any)
multi method grabpairs(Baggy:D: $count --> List:D)

Returns a Pair or a List of Pairs depending on the version of the method being invoked. Each Pair returned has an element of the invocant as its key and the elements weight as its value. Unlike pickpairs, it works only on mutable structures, e.g. BagHash. Use of grabpairs on 'an immutable structure results in an X::Immutable exception. If * is passed as $count, or $count is greater than or equal to the number of elements of the invocant, then all element/weight Pairs from the invocant are returned in a random sequence.

What makes grabpairs different from pickpairs is that the 'grabbed' elements are in fact removed from the invocant.

my $breakfast = (eggs => 2bacon => 3).BagHash;
say $breakfast.grabpairs;                         # OUTPUT: «bacon => 3␤» 
say $breakfast;                                   # OUTPUT: «BagHash.new(eggs(2))␤» 
say $breakfast.grabpairs(1);                      # OUTPUT: «[eggs => 2]␤» 
say $breakfast.grabpairs(*);                      # OUTPUT: «[]␤» 
 
my $diet = ('eggs' => 2'bacon' => 3).Bag;
say $diet.grabpairs;
CATCH { default { put .^name''.Str } };
# OUTPUT: «X::Immutable: Cannot call 'grabpairs' on an immutable 'Bag'␤» 

(Baggy) method pick

Defined as:

multi method pick(Baggy:D: --> Any)
multi method pick(Baggy:D: $count --> Seq:D)

Like an ordinary list pick, but returns keys of the invocant weighted by their values, as if the keys were replicated the number of times indicated by the corresponding value and then list pick used. The underlying metaphor for picking is that you're pulling colored marbles out a bag. (For "picking with replacement" see roll instead). If * is passed as $count, or $count is greater than or equal to the total of the invocant, then total elements from the invocant are returned in a random sequence.

Note that each pick invocation maintains its own private state and has no effect on subsequent pick invocations.

my $breakfast = bag <eggs bacon bacon bacon>;
say $breakfast.pick;                              # OUTPUT: «eggs␤» 
say $breakfast.pick(2);                           # OUTPUT: «(eggs bacon)␤» 
 
say $breakfast.total;                             # OUTPUT: «4␤» 
say $breakfast.pick(*);                           # OUTPUT: «(bacon bacon bacon eggs)␤» 

(Baggy) method pickpairs

Defined as:

multi method pickpairs(Baggy:D: --> Pair:D)
multi method pickpairs(Baggy:D: $count --> List:D)

Returns a Pair or a List of Pairs depending on the version of the method being invoked. Each Pair returned has an element of the invocant as its key and the elements weight as its value. The elements are 'picked' without replacement. If * is passed as $count, or $count is greater than or equal to the number of elements of the invocant, then all element/weight Pairs from the invocant are returned in a random sequence.

Note that each pickpairs invocation maintains its own private state and has no effect on subsequent pickpairs invocations.

my $breakfast = bag <eggs bacon bacon bacon>;
say $breakfast.pickpairs;                         # OUTPUT: «eggs => 1␤» 
say $breakfast.pickpairs(1);                      # OUTPUT: «(bacon => 3)␤» 
say $breakfast.pickpairs(*);                      # OUTPUT: «(eggs => 1 bacon => 3)␤» 

(Baggy) method roll

Defined as:

multi method roll(Baggy:D: --> Any:D)
multi method roll(Baggy:D: $count --> Seq:D)

Like an ordinary list roll, but returns keys of the invocant weighted by their values, as if the keys were replicated the number of times indicated by the corresponding value and then list roll used. The underlying metaphor for rolling is that you're throwing $count dice that are independent of each other, which (in bag terms) is equivalent to picking a colored marble out your bag and then putting it back, and doing this $count times. In dice terms, the number of marbles corresponds to the number of sides, and the number of marbles of the same color corresponds to the number of sides with the same color. (For "picking without replacement" see pick instead).

If * is passed to $count, returns a lazy, infinite sequence of randomly chosen elements from the invocant.

my $breakfast = bag <eggs bacon bacon bacon>;
say $breakfast.roll;                                  # OUTPUT: «bacon␤» 
say $breakfast.roll(3);                               # OUTPUT: «(bacon eggs bacon)␤» 
 
my $random_dishes := $breakfast.roll(*);
say $random_dishes[^5];                               # OUTPUT: «(bacon eggs bacon bacon bacon)␤» 

(Baggy) method pairs

Defined as:

method pairs(Baggy:D: --> Seq:D)

Returns all elements and their respective weights as a Seq of Pairs where the key is the element itself and the value is the weight of that element.

my $breakfast = bag <bacon eggs bacon>;
my $seq = $breakfast.pairs;
say $seq.sort;                                    # OUTPUT: «(bacon => 2 eggs => 1)␤» 

(Baggy) method antipairs

Defined as:

method antipairs(Baggy:D: --> Seq:D)

Returns all elements and their respective weights as a Seq of Pairs, where the element itself is the value and the weight of that element is the key, i.e. the opposite of method pairs.

my $breakfast = bag <bacon eggs bacon>;
my $seq = $breakfast.antipairs;
say $seq.sort;                                    # OUTPUT: «(1 => eggs 2 => bacon)␤» 

(Baggy) method invert

Defined as:

method invert(Baggy:D: --> Seq:D)

Returns all elements and their respective weights as a Seq of Pairs, where the element itself is the value and the weight of that element is the key, i.e. the opposite of method pairs. Except for some esoteric cases invert on a Baggy type returns the same result as antipairs.

my $breakfast = bag <bacon eggs bacon>;
my $seq = $breakfast.invert;
say $seq.sort;                                    # OUTPUT: «(1 => eggs 2 => bacon)␤» 

(Baggy) method classify-list

Defined as:

multi method classify-list(&mapper*@list --> Baggy:D)
multi method classify-list(%mapper*@list --> Baggy:D)
multi method classify-list(@mapper*@list --> Baggy:D)

Populates a mutable Baggy by classifying the possibly-empty @list of values using the given mapper. The @list cannot be lazy.

say BagHash.new.classify-list: { $_ %% 2 ?? 'even' !! 'odd' }^10;
# OUTPUT: BagHash.new(even(5), odd(5)) 
 
my @mapper = <zero one two three four five>;
say MixHash.new.classify-list: @mapper123446;
# OUTPUT: MixHash.new((Any), two, three, four(2), one) 

The mapper can be a Callable that takes a single argument, an Associative, or an Iterable. With Associative and an Iterable mappers, the values in the @list represent the key and index of the mapper's value respectively. A Callable mapper will be executed once per each item in the @list, with that item as the argument and its return value will be used as the mapper's value.

The mapper's value is used as the key of the Baggy that will be incremented by 1. See .categorize-list if you wish to classify an item into multiple categories at once.

Note: unlike the Hash's .classify-list, returning an Iterable mapper's value will throw, as Baggy types do not support nested classification. For the same reason, Baggy's .classify-list does not accept :&as parameter.

(Baggy) method categorize-list

Defined as:

multi method categorize-list(&mapper*@list --> Baggy:D)
multi method categorize-list(%mapper*@list --> Baggy:D)
multi method categorize-list(@mapper*@list --> Baggy:D)

Populates a mutable Baggy by categorizing the possibly-empty @list of values using the given mapper. The @list cannot be lazy.

say BagHash.new.categorize-list: {
    gather {
        take 'largish' if $_ > 5;
        take .is-prime ?? 'prime' !! 'non-prime';
        take $_ %% 2   ?? 'even'  !! 'odd';
    }
}^10;
# OUTPUT: BagHash.new(largish(4), even(5), non-prime(6), prime(4), odd(5)) 
 
my %mapper = :sugar<sweet white>:lemon<sour>:cake('sweet''is a lie');
say MixHash.new.categorize-list: %mapper, <sugar lemon cake>;
# OUTPUT: MixHash.new(is a lie, sour, white, sweet(2)) 

The mapper can be a Callable that takes a single argument, an Associative, or an Iterable. With Associative and an Iterable mappers, the values in the @list represent the key and index of the mapper's value respectively. A Callable mapper will be executed once per each item in the @list, with that item as the argument and its return value will be used as the mapper's value.

The mapper's value is used as a possibly-empty list of keys of the Baggy that will be incremented by 1.

Note: unlike the Hash's .categorize-list, returning a list of Iterables as mapper's value will throw, as Baggy types do not support nested categorization. For the same reason, Baggy's .categorize-list does not accept :&as parameter.

(Baggy) method keys

Defined as:

method keys(Baggy:D: --> List:D)

Returns a list of all keys in the Baggy object without taking their individual weights into account as opposed to kxxv.

my $breakfast = bag <eggs spam spam spam>;
say $breakfast.keys.sort;                        # OUTPUT: «(eggs spam)␤» 
 
my $n = ("a" => 5"b" => 2).BagHash;
say $n.keys.sort;                                # OUTPUT: «(a b)␤» 

(Baggy) method values

Defined as:

method values(Baggy:D: --> List:D)

Returns a list of all values, i.e. weights, in the Baggy object.

my $breakfast = bag <eggs spam spam spam>;
say $breakfast.values.sort;                      # OUTPUT: «(1 3)␤» 
 
my $n = ("a" => 5"b" => 2"a" => 1).BagHash;
say $n.values.sort;                              # OUTPUT: «(2 6)␤» 

(Baggy) method kv

Defined as:

method kv(Baggy:D: --> List:D)

Returns a list of keys and values interleaved.

my $breakfast = bag <eggs spam spam spam>;
say $breakfast.kv;                                # OUTPUT: «(spam 3 eggs 1)␤» 
 
my $n = ("a" => 5"b" => 2"a" => 1).BagHash;
say $n.kv;                                        # OUTPUT: «(a 6 b 2)␤» 

(Baggy) method kxxv

Defined as:

method kxxv(Baggy:D: --> List:D)

Returns a list of the keys of the invocant, with each key multiplied by its weight. Note that kxxv only works for Baggy types which have integer weights, i.e. Bag and BagHash.

my $breakfast = bag <spam eggs spam spam bacon>;
say $breakfast.kxxv.sort;                         # OUTPUT: «(bacon eggs spam spam spam)␤» 
 
my $n = ("a" => 0"b" => 1"b" => 2).BagHash;
say $n.kxxv;                                      # OUTPUT: «(b b b)␤» 

(Baggy) method elems

Defined as:

method elems(Baggy:D: --> Int:D)

Returns the number of elements in the Baggy object without taking the individual elements weight into account.

my $breakfast = bag <eggs spam spam spam>;
say $breakfast.elems;                             # OUTPUT: «2␤» 
 
my $n = ("b" => 9.4"b" => 2).MixHash;
say $n.elems;                                     # OUTPUT: «1␤» 

(Baggy) method total

Defined as:

method total(Baggy:D:)

Returns the sum of weights for all elements in the Baggy object.

my $breakfast = bag <eggs spam spam bacon>;
say $breakfast.total;                             # OUTPUT: «4␤» 
 
my $n = ("a" => 5"b" => 1"b" => 2).BagHash;
say $n.total;                                     # OUTPUT: «8␤» 

(Baggy) method default

Defined as:

method default(Baggy:D: --> Int:D)

Returns zero.

my $breakfast = bag <eggs bacon>;
say $breakfast.default;                           # OUTPUT: «0␤» 

(Baggy) method hash

Defined as:

method hash(Baggy:D: --> Hash:D)

Returns a Hash where the elements of the invocant are the keys and their respective weights the values;

my $breakfast = bag <eggs bacon bacon>;
my $h = $breakfast.hash;
say $h.WHAT;                                      # OUTPUT: «(Hash)␤» 
say $h;                                           # OUTPUT: «{bacon => 2, eggs => 1}␤» 

(Baggy) method Bool

Defined as:

method Bool(Baggy:D: --> Bool:D)

Returns True if the invocant contains at least one element.

my $breakfast = ('eggs' => 1).BagHash;
say $breakfast.Bool;                              # OUTPUT: «True   (since we have one element)␤» 
$breakfast<eggs> = 0;                             # weight == 0 will lead to element removal 
say $breakfast.Bool;                              # OUTPUT: «False␤» 

(Baggy) method Set

Defined as:

method Set(--> Set:D)

Returns a Set whose elements are the keys of the invocant.

my $breakfast = (eggs => 2bacon => 3).BagHash;
say $breakfast.Set;                               # OUTPUT: «set(bacon, eggs)␤» 

(Baggy) method SetHash

Defined as:

method SetHash(--> SetHash:D)

Returns a SetHash whose elements are the keys of the invocant.

my $breakfast = (eggs => 2bacon => 3).BagHash;
my $sh = $breakfast.SetHash;
say $sh.WHAT;                                     # OUTPUT: «(SetHash)␤» 
say $sh.elems;                                    # OUTPUT: «2␤» 

(Baggy) method ACCEPTS

Defined as:

method ACCEPTS($other --> Bool:D)

Used in smart-matching if the right-hand side is a Baggy.

If the right hand side is the type object, i.e. Baggy, the method returns True if $other does Baggy otherwise False is returned.

If the right hand side is a Baggy object, True is returned only if $other has the same elements, with the same weights, as the invocant.

my $breakfast = bag <eggs bacon>;
say $breakfast ~~ Baggy;                            # OUTPUT: «True␤» 
say $breakfast.does(Baggy);                         # OUTPUT: «True␤» 
 
my $second-breakfast = (eggs => 1bacon => 1).Mix;
say $breakfast ~~ $second-breakfast;                # OUTPUT: «True␤» 
 
my $third-breakfast = (eggs => 1bacon => 2).Bag;
say $second-breakfast ~~ $third-breakfast;          # OUTPUT: «False␤»