Pragmas

Special modules for special use

In Perl 6, pragmas are core modules used to either identify a specific version of Perl 6 to be used or to modify its normal behavior in some way. They are "use"ed in your code just as normal modules:

use v6.c;

Following is a list of pragmas with a short description of each pragma's purpose or a link to more details about its use. (Note: Pragmas marked "[NYI]" are not yet implemented, and those marked "[TBD]" are to be defined later.)

This pragma is not currently part of any Perl 6 specification, but is present in Rakudo as a synonym to use nqp (see below).

A lexical pragma that makes Failures returned from routines fatal. For example, prefix + on a Str coerces it to Numeric, but will return a Failure if the string contains non-numeric characters. Saving that Failure in a variable prevents it from being sunk, and so the first code block below reaches the say $x.^name; line and prints Failure in output.

In the second block, the use fatal pragma is enabled, so the say line is never reached because the Exception contained in the Failure returned from prefix + gets thrown and the CATCH block gets run, printing the Caught... line. Note that both blocks are the same program and use fatal only affects the lexical block it was used in:

{
    my $x = +"a";
    say $x.^name;
    CATCH { default { say "Caught {.^name}" } }
} # OUTPUT: «Failure␤» 
 
{
    use fatal;
    my $x = +"a";
    say $x.^name;
    CATCH { default { say "Caught {.^name}" } }
} # OUTPUT: «Caught X::Str::Numeric␤» 

Inside of a try blocks, the fatal pragma is enabled by default, and you can disable it with no fatal:

try {
    my $x = +"a";
    say $x.^name;
    CATCH { default { say "Caught {.^name}" } }
} # OUTPUT: «Caught X::Str::Numeric␤» 
 
try {
    no fatal;
    my $x = +"a";
    say $x.^name;
    CATCH { default { say "Caught {.^name}" } }
} # OUTPUT: «Failure␤» 

Set the value of the $?LF constant in the scope it is called. Possible values are :lf (which is the default, indicating Line Feed), :crlf (indicating Carriage Return, Line Feed) and :cr (indicating Carriage Return).

Use at your own risk.

This is a Rakudo-specific pragma. With it, Rakudo provides access to the nqp opcodes in a top level namespace:

use nqp;
nqp::say("hello world");

This uses the underlying nqp say opcode instead of the Perl 6 routine. This pragma may make your code rely on a particular version of nqp, and since that code is not part of the Perl 6 specification, it's not guaranteed to be stable. You may find a large number of usages in the Rakudo core, which are used to make the core functionality as fast as possible. Future optimizations in the code generation of Rakudo may obsolete these usages.

The default allows precompilation of source code, specifically if used in a module. If for whatever reason you do not want the code (of your module) to be precompiled, you can use no precompilation. This will prevent the entire compilation unit (usually a file) from being precompiled.

strict is the default behavior, and requires that you declare variables before using them. You can relax this restriction with no.

    no strict$x = 42# OK 

When use trace is activated, any line of code executing will be written to STDERR. You can use no trace to switch off the feature, so this only happens for certain sections of code.

The following pragma's have been discussed in the past, but will most likely never see any functionality implemented for them:

MONKEY-BARS, MONKEY-BRAINS, MONKEY-BUSINESS, MONKEY-SHINE, MONKEY-TRAP, MONKEY-WRENCH